The French sociologist Pierre Bourdieu once argued that most studies of society assumed that the society could be separated from the person that observed it. The sociologist, as he would argue, had to contend with many assumptions before they could study a certain social group. His problem was never with the study of societies, but with the people who studied it, who all rarely examined how they were related to what they were studying. This meant that there were strict limits to what people understood about societies because they portrayed their opinions as objective fact, a perspective that assumed a very stark separation between the person who studied the society and the society that was the object of study.

— Thomas Sebacher

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Thomas Sebacher

Thomas Sebacher

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BA, Philosophy & Religion, BS in History, also a part time editor and writer on my publication, The Bridge